Social Security Disability based on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Social Security Disability based on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

shutterstock_188423444If you have been diagnosed with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome either in one arm or in both arms it is still going to be pretty hard for you to win a Social Security Disability case unless you have other accompanying impairments.  Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is caused by the swelling in wrists that puts pressure on the nerve; therefore, it is going to make it very difficult for you to perform fine manipulative tasks like typing or writing.  It is also going to be difficult to perform gripping tasks.  This can have a significant influence on the sedentary workplace on your ability to perform office jobs never the less there are many other jobs that a person can be found to be able to do by only occasionally using their hands because they are limited by Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.  To prove Carpal Tunnel Syndrome there are definite tests out there such as nerve conduction studies and even physical examinations the doctors can do to show your gripping strength and your fine manipulative strength.

In most cases though if you have bilateral Carpal Tunnel Syndrome your best chance of winning Social Security Disability benefits is if that condition accompanies other medical impairments.  For example, if a person has lower back pain and the judge determines that despite that lower back pain they can do a sit down job most sit down jobs either require that you answer the phone, work on the computer or if it’s on an assembly job line you are still going to be having to use your hands to gather parts or to lift items so sometimes the impairment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can be just what we need in a case to push it over the line into disability land, so to speak, and it will be just enough to receive overall disability.  Also when I have clients diagnosed with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome I have forms that I give to the doctor who diagnosed that specifically request tests to be done so that we have proof guarding the person’s limitations in gripping and fine manipulation.

This short informational blog post was provided by Anne Howard, an experienced Connecticut Social Security Disability Lawyer.