How Social Security Determines If Someone Is Disabled

How Social Security Determines If Someone Is Disabled

  • The Administration applies a Five-Step Sequential Evaluation Process to determine whether or not Someone is Disabled
  • Step One of the Process involves Social Security Observation of your Gainful Employment
  • Individuals applying for Disability that push hard to go to work every day must either stop working, or reduce their work hours to 20-25 hours a week
  • Your Gross Income must also be less than $1070 per month
  • Step Two of the Process involves the determination of a Severe, Physical, or Mental Impairment
  • Step Three of the Process involved the observation of your Medical Condition to determine your rank on Social Security Listing
  • This Listing will determine any required Laboratory Testing or Examination Results, in order for a Claimant to meet or equal the Listing
  • A person may win their Case at this Step with Altimeter’s Disease or a Spinal Disorder
  • The Criteria to meet these Listings is very Specific, so the Condition must be very Serious
  • Step Four of the Process will involve Social Security looking at your Past Relevant Work, which is Full-Time Work that you have done over the last 15 Years
  • If you have done sedentary Office Work that does not require excessive exertion, it may be harder for you to win a Social Security Case, based on Physical Limitations
  • It is easier to get past Step Four if your past work involved Excessive Physical Involvement, such as Construction
  • Step Five of the Process look at whether or not you can perform any other Work Activity in the National Economy
  • For example, if you are a 45 year-old man who can no longer perform your Roofing Job due to Physical Pain, you may lose at Step Five if you are capable of performing Easy Sedentary Jobs
  • At Step Five, you must also show that there are no other Jobs in the National Economy that you can perform, due to the severity of your Limitations
  • It is easier to win at Step Five if you are over the Age of 50 or 55

This short informational video was provided by Anne Howard, an experienced Connecticut Social Security Disability Lawyer.